What is CMS?

The Chicago Manual of Style (CMS) is the preferred formatting and style guidelines used by the disciplines of history, philosophy, religion, and the arts. The CMS was first developed by the University of Chicago Press in 1906 as guidelines for consistent writing and publishing formatting. This quick reference guide focuses on how to format the title page, the notes, and bibliography citations in Chicago Manual Style.

Title Page

In CMS, a title page is required. To make a title page in CMS...

  • Set margins to 1” on each side
  • Use Times New Roman, 12 pt. font
  • Center your title a third of the way down on the title page
  • Center the following information 3-4 lines down from the title
    • Your First and Last Name
    • The Course Number and Title
    • The Due Date of the Paper

Example Title Page

Chicago Manual Style Title Page

Notes

A note is used as a citation after you have included information from a source within your paper. As an example, if you are including a quote from Joan Scott’s Gender and the Politics of History in your paper, directly after the quote, you would include a note of the citation information. These numbers correspond to footnotes at the bottom of the page. The first time that you refer to a source, you will write a full citation, but each time you reference that source again with a paraphrase or a quote, you will include a shortened citation in the note.

Example of footnotes

To create these footnotes, click on the “References” tab in your MS Word document. Then select the “Insert Footnote” option.

Insert Footnote Button

Bibliography

In CMS, in addition to using a note to cite your source within the paper, you will also include a list of all the sources you used as a bibliography. The bibliography list should be the final page of your paper.

  • Center the word Bibliography at the top of the page
  • List entries in alphabetical order
  • Single space each entry, but allow one blank space between each entry
  • Use a hanging indent for each entry
Chicago Manual Style Bibliography

 

Formatting Examples of Notes and Bibliography

If you need help making CMS notes and bibliography entries, look to these examples:

Notes

  1. Sarah Palmer, “How to do Basically Anything,” Journal of Historical Initiatives 17 (2013): 133.
  2. Palmer, “Basically Anything,” 134.

Bibliography

For Example

Palmer, Sarah. “How to do Basically Anything,” Journal of Historical Initiatives 17 (2013): 133-135, doi: 1980.4947654.

Notes:

  1. Rebecca Cox, The College Fear Factor (Harvard University Press, 2009), 17.
  2. Cox, Fear Factor, 28.

Bibliography:

For Example

Cox, Rebecca D., The College Fear Factor. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2009.

Notes:

  1. Ramos Tobin, “UPS Profit Nearly Doubles in Second Quarter,” The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, July 22, 2010, accessed August 17, 2010, http://www.ajc.com
  2. Tobin, “UPS Profit.”

Bibliography:

For Example

Tobin, Ramos, “UPS Profit Nearly Doubles in Second Quarter,” The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, July 22, 2010. Accessed August 17, 2010. http://www.ajc.com

Notes:

  1. “Police and Detectives,” U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, accessed on September 3, 2015, http://www.bls.gov/oco/pdf/ocos160.pdf
  2. “Police and Detectives.”

Bibliography:

For Example

U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. “Police and Detectives.” Accessed September 3, 2015.  http://www.bls.gov/oco/pdf/ocos160.pdf

Notes:

  1. Karen A. Rader and Victoria E. Cain, Life on Display: Revolutionizing U.S. Museums of Science and Natural History in the Twentieth Century (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2014), 80-83.

Bibliography:

For Example

Rader, Karen A. and Cain, Victoria E. Life on Display: Revolutionizing U.S. Museums of Science and Natural History in the Twentieth Century. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2014.

Note:

  1. Susan Leigh Star, “Craft vs. Commodity, Mess vs. Trancendence: How the Right Tool For the Job Became the Wrong One in the case of Taxidermy and Natural History” in Adela. E. Clarke and Joan H. Fujimura, The Right Tools for the Job: At Work in the Twentieth-Century Life Sciences (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1992), 257-286.

Bibliography:

For Example

Star, Susan Leigh. “Craft vs. Commodity, Mess vs. Transcendence: How the Right Tool For the Job Became the Wrong One in the case of Taxidermy and Natural History,” in The Right Tools for the Job: At Work in the Twentieth-Century Life Sciences. Edited by Adela E. Clarke. and Joan H Fujimura. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1992.

Note:

  1. James H Johnson, “Opera as Social Duty,” in Listening in Paris: A Cultural History (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1996), 9-34.

Bibliography:

For Example

Johnson, James H. “Opera as Social Duty” in Listening in Paris: A Cultural History. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1996, 9-34.

Note:

  1. Ho Chi Minh, “Declaration of Independence of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam (1945)” in Voices of Decolonization: A Brief History with Documents, edited by Todd Shepard (Boston: Bedford St. Martin’s Press, 2015), 49-52.

Bibliography:

For Example

Minh, Ho Chi. “Declaration of Independence of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam (1945)” in Voices of Decolonization: A Brief History with Documents. Edited by Todd Shepard. Boston: Bedford St. Martin’s Press, 2015, 49-52.

Note:

  1. Thomas Paine. The American Crisis, reprint (London: R.Carlisle, 1819), accessed December 1, 2015, https://play.google.com/books/reader?id=jUVHAQAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover&output=reader&hl=en&pg=GBS.PP7.

Bibliography:

For Example

Thomas Paine. The American Crisis (reprint). London: R.Carlisle, 1819. Accessed December 1, 2015, https://play.google.com/books/reader?id=jUVHAQAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover&output=reader&hl=en&pg=GBS.PP7.